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and the government's failings in the war in thoroanistan. ...n w well-known face for c-span viewers mary frances berry professor at the university of pennsylvania also of the author of several books. we're at the university of pennsylvania to talk to her about and justice for all. the united states commission on civil rights in the continuing struggle for freedom in america quote. when did this all rights commission begin? >> 1957. president eisenhower had a lot of discussion with john foster dulles the secretary of state because of the races around the world people would hear about and read about and the fact there seemed to be episodes whether lynching or discrimination in the country. eisenhower said he would ask congress to set up a civil-rights commission to put the facts on the table and i am told by someone at the meeting he slammed the table and they will put the facts on the table. policy is sometimes said up because there is a tough problem is that the report then they go away but in the future would depend on what it found out and how aggressive it was in the public thought about it.
>> next come and interview recorded at university of pennsylvania, mary frances berry shysters experiences on the united states commission on civil rights, set up by president eisenhower in the 1950s senate. this is about half an hour. >> host: on your screen now as a well-known face for c-span viewers. that is mary frances berry, professor university of pennsylvania and also the author of several books, where the university of pennsylvania to talk to her about this book, justice for all. united states commission on civil rights and continuing struggle for freedom in america. mary frances berry, when did the u.s. civil rights commission began and why? >> guest: well, the civil rights commission started in 1957. president eisenhower had a lot of discussions with john foster dulles, secretary of state about the way the united states is seen around the world because of the racism going on, that people would hear about and read about and the fact that there seemed to be a lot of episodes that kept happening, whether as lynching or some discrimination taking place in the country. so
, he had been governor of virginia, ambassador of france, secretary of state, vice president of the united states, member of the congress. author of the decoration of independence. it's one of the few people in english history have been evaluated or inspected as closely as thomas jefferson was before he became president of the united states. people were looking at him and saying this is the guy we want. this is the person who should be president. >> host: the opponent said this isn't the guy we want. it was a close election. >> guest: it was. it was a strange election. >> host: it was strange election. it was hard fought. he had a lot of animation. you're saying, i guess what you're really saying is that both the supporters and the opponents knew who they were talking about. >> guest: partly that. what i'm saying is that especially when parties become ideological. any democrat is going different from any republican or any democrat is going different from any federalist. if you're measuring individual leader impact you shouldn't measure the democratic you should measure agains
nations, such as france or spain whatever, you had to make george iii out to be a tyrant. so he came up with all of these arguments about what he did and that is with jefferson did. >> what did you think? >> i was not a big jeffersonian after i did all of this. he was a wordsmith. he was not a good executive when he was governor of virginia. he was not able to organize effective resistance. he was't famous until famous in the sense that we know historically now. so when he was running for president in the 17 nineties, he held in sulphide as the author of the declaration of independence. which in some ways he was. nobody even cared about that in the 1770s. but that was his claim to fame when he was running for the presidency. he and john adams died on the same day. that is when the whole thing became a sainted document. it was god's handiwork that he -- that they died on the same day. >> would you have fit back in those days? >> up probably would have been a trouble maker -- i probably would have been a trouble maker. i probably also would have been somebody who had a strategic bent. i'm
to be credible to the other nations so they could gain from france or spain, and this was another reason for the declaration of independence, you had to make george iii out to be a tyrant. sonya, with all these arguments about what he did. that is where tempers and dead. -- so they made all these arguments. >> what did you think about jefferson? >> i did not think much. he was a words maturity was not a good governor of virginia. the british almost caught him one time. he was not able to organize effective resistance. he was not famous until he was -- famous in the sense that we know him historical now -- until when he was running for president in the 17 nineties. he held himself out as the author of the declaration of independence, which in some ways he was. nobody had cared about that during 1770 s, but it helped him. that was his claim to fame when he was running for the presidency. then when he and john adams died on the same day, july 4, 1826, and that's when the whole thing became the document that this was god's handiwork, but they died on the same day. >> knowing what you know ab
. >> juliet: president obama continues to push for tax hikes on the rich. and france lost a bid to raise taxes and he want today raise to 75%. now, there weren't a lot of people he was focused on, really not that much money, he was going to raise, but the fact is he wanted the french judicial council, however, said it would have been excessive and unconstitutional. joining us-- >> sorry, dave. >> dave: and for tax foundation from the heritage foundation. >> juliet: good morning, curtis. >> good morning. >> dave: what's the deal here, the decision made is not unconstitutional, but bottom line, bad for the economy? i think we can learn from this? >> that's right, the court has bailed them out. and the tax increase, 75% rate was going to really damage the french economy. the french economy's already strugglingling and adding on the economy would be worse. >> i'm looking at it, expected to be a temporary two year measure and affect 1500 people and raise less than 661 million dollars. >> but the revenue we brought in, and what it would have done, it would have reduced the incentives, and working an
. >> clayton: what about france? when is the last time you've been to france? >> 20 years ago. >> clayton: they did something fascinating that you may like yesterday. >> no, no, no, you've got it all wrong. >> clayton: they shot down the -- the court shot down raising taxes on the rich, that tax rate was set to go up to 75% under the new leader of france. that's not going to happen. can we learn something from that? [ laughter ] what you learn is that the french government will immediately reword the law, resubmit it and actually catch even more people who will pay 75%. >> clayton: just the rich, the gerard depardieus. >> if you want to tax rich for ideological reason, you're going to do it no matter what the economic results. that's true in france and probable will he in america. >> dave: yes or no get a pick cliff deal done? >> very last minute, exceptionally narrow deal based on 4 or $500,000 deal, tax those above it. you've still got a huge mess on your hands any where i you slice it inasmuch watch slash. >> dave: watch varney to see what deal is cut. >> clayton: are the markets open
with what's happening there. >> okay, rick, huge in france. we know french economy not that good. women want to make some money during this period. france is strong for you. >> we've grown, almost doubled the company in the last five years in france. we're the biggest company of our kind in france. we're the largest seller of cookbooks in france. we had some issues the first two quarters, during the election, as you know, most of the consumers sat on the sidelines. we're starting to see it come back to life again. so we feel very good about france. ditto germany. >> isn't that incredible. >> rick, 52-week high when compared to avon. incredible. thank you so much for joining us. >> good to be here. >> good to see you. >> all right. stay tuned. sfx- "sounds of african drum and flute" look who's back. again? it's embarrassing it's embarrassing! we can see you carl. we can totally see you. come on you're better than this...all that prowling around. yeah, you're the king of the jungle. have you thought about going vegan carl? hahaha!! you know folks who save hundreds of dollars by switching to ge
, a strange thing began to happen to them. and oddly enough, france is the key to understanding the transformation in jefferson. when you think of france we think of sally and james hemmings. we think of french food. jefferson getting to know french architecture and wind. but he went over there on very important national business. he was there as our trade representative. we were desperate for money. we owed a lot of money. the u.s. owed enormous debts to britain, and our most important export was a slave race car. it was tobacco. which brought in some $30 million a year. now, jefferson had one problem. the most important and influential friends yet in court among the french aristocrats were all abolitionists. and they couldn't understand how we fought a war for universal liberty without freeing the slaves. and they put him under tremendous pressure and they kept asking them kept asking him, when is america going to free the slaves? so he began making promises that america, that emancipation was really just around the corner. he was imminent. we
action. france called for aid, nothing happened. turkey called for safe haven, nothing happened. everybody is looking to the united states. unfortunately, it is the same position since august of last year, which focused more on the target sanctions and all of that. unless there is actually a change in the u.s. position to take more action, i do not think something will change in the military. building a central command of the free syrian army, that needs training, international assistance. that is something only the united states can do. >> do you have a follow up question? >> my question is, you have said the days of asad are numbered and it is only a matter of time before he falls. what can we expect to happen with them when he falls? will we see a scene similar to libya where his body is dragged through the streets? will he be tried in syria? what do you envision to happen, and what do you hope to happen? >> that is difficult to answer. we know the days of the regime is approaching. that may take one year or more. we see that with the reluctance and the hesitance of the inter
has asked france and the united states for help to stop rebels that threaten rule. >>> it's not clear who will replace lisa jackson as the head of the environmental protection agency. jackson announced yesterday she's stepping down in january after the president's state of the union address. the epa created new standards for air pollution from coal power plants on her watch. >>> massachusetts congressman ed ma markey throwing his hat into the ring for kerry's senate seat. a special election would be held early this summer. markey a 66-year-old democrat is the first prominent candidate to declare for the race. >>> mom and pop shops across the country bracing for a labor fight that could cripple businesses. more on the key workers that could walk off the job coming up. consider this: when the unexpected happens, there's one brand of battery more emergency workers trust in their maglites: duracell. one reason: duralock power preserve. it locks in power for up to 10 years in storage. guaranteed. so, whether it's 10 years' of life's sunny days... or... the occasional stormy one... trust go
and two in august. i mean, you have to have august off, right? france. compare that to the average american worker to works about 230 days a year. writer for the national review and maria, a cnn contributor. i'm sure we can all agree we would love that schedule. especially if your compensation remained what it was. now, eric cantor, being serious here, says the new calendar allows lawmakers a week a month to spend back at home. when ip did the math, 126 days in washington is 25 workweeks. that's only 50% of the year. >> erin, members of congress are still doing their jobs when they are in their constituencies, when they are reaching out to their constituents. they are still working on legislation and much else. if you are concerned about congress wasting time, we ought to be more concerned about the fact that individual candidates are raising money rather than parties. that's the thing that really distracts them from the hard work of legislating. being out there in their districts, that's actually really, really important as a part of their job. >> i think we can all agree with tha
century france. our movie critics are here with the review of "les mis." >> plus you can e-mail your pet questions to pet questions wbal tv.com. >> experts estimate americans spent more than $110 billion on gift cards this year. but if you received a gift card in your stocking, there are warnings that you need to be aware of. complaints have become so common, ftc has filed action against retailers. it's federal law for companies to disclose fees on their gift cards or at least make them easily seen by customers. >> any expiration on the card must be clearly disclosed on the card itself and any fees, such as inactivity fees must also be clearly disclosed either on the card or on packaging. >> and those inactivity fees can on be imposed after a certain period of time. that's usually after at least one year that the card has not been used. so the best advice from the ftc, if you have received a gift card, use it right away, trust and know your source and avoid any online auction sites. andy barnett is here from the better business bureau for tips on making those returns. do people really re
. eight days in january, two in august. you got to have august off, right? france. compare that to the average american worker to works about 230 days a year. rihan and maria, okay, i'm sure we can all agree we would love that schedule. okay, especially if your compensation remained what it was. now, eric cantor, being serious here, says the new calendar allows lawic makers to spend time at home. 126 days in washington is 25 workweeks. that's only 50% of the year. >> members of congress are still doing their jobs when they're in their constituencies. they're still working on legislation and much else. if you're concerned about congress wasting time, i think we ought to be more concerned about the fact that individual candidates are raising money, rather than parties. being out there in their districts, getting in touch with folks who understand their interests, that's really, really important as a part of their job. >> i think we can agree on that, but do they need that much time? how much of this is going to things americans don't want? >> it's way too much, i think, erin,
as quote counterproductive. france, great britain and the eu also criticized. >> the location as opposed to the number. the announcement to build on the area that is known as e-1, designated in that way. is highly significant. because no government of israel has previously announced major construction in that area. it's pretty much open land. and it represents the possible last link in blocking a geographically contiguous palestinian state. so it's highly significant and will be seen that way in the region. >> are the settlements, are they the biggest impediment to a long-term solution? >> no i don't think they are the single-biggest impediment, i think they are one of the impediments, i think it's a mistake to assign rankings to the problems in the middle east. jerusalem is highly important, very emotional on both sides. i should emphasize that while i believe that the announcement of the settlement construction on e-1 is counterproductive and moves away from a resolution, so is the palestinian action going to the you united nations. what you have here are a series of actions and reacti
that was the spiritual refugee from france. when he encountered hurt he saw this incredible spirituality that was unexpressed that he could drop out of her to allow her deep devotion to jesus christ to heal his own spiritual battle. there was a confluence there that i think is a love story of a high-level that we could not appreciate. they had a union they circled each other and they observe each other. she died at the age of 24 immediately after her body was transfigured. she has already passed away and was a recluse with only a couple of the male friends. they started securing. they burned some of her garments to have a tea out of it to and the miracles kept up through the 1760s when the english came to take canada from the french and then it ceased. payback in the 1840's. they discovered her and they got irked manuscripts from the archives. and she started to affect more cures. what prompted the pope to canonize hurt is in the state of washington -- fell down and hit his lip balm the pedestal and was afflicted with the flesh eating bacteria. google his name is jake. there are pictures
of a spiritual refugee from france. he was having his own spiritual dilemmas. and when he encountered her, he saw this incredible spirituality that was sort of unexpressed, and he was able to sort of draw can it out of her. and allow her spirituality, her mysticism, her deep devotion to jesus christ to sort of help him heal his own spiritual doubts. and i think together there was a confluence there of this spiritual energy which, i think, is a love story on a very high-refined level. it's sort of a divine love that, say, you or i wouldn't be able to appreciate. and they had this union, i suppose, where they sort of circled each other, and he observed her, and i think she observed him. when she died at the age of 24, it was april 17, 1680, immediately after her death her body was transfigured. and there are two written accounts which are in that book right there that was part of her cause over in rome. now, she's already passed away, and she was only 24 years old, and she was a recluse. she only had a couple of female friends that knew her really well but for the priests, and he started this curin
the story of dominique strauss kahn. he had been a frontrunner for the presidency in france before a housekeeper here in new york said he sexually assaulted her in a hotel room in manhattan. prosecutors eventually dropped their criminal case after issues arose with the accuser's credibility, but she still brought her own civil suit against strauss kahn, and today a judge here in new york announced both sides had struck a deal, but of course, as with most settlements, no details of the settlement released. >>> well, you probably got a nice surprise last time you topped off your tank. prices on average of gas are falling. 2012 will still go down as the most expensive year for gas ever. how much lower could they go? we'll get to that. >>> if you think those assembly instructions leave ikea shoppers confused, what if you walked into the store and saw that? sharable data across 10 devices with unlimited talk and text. get a droid razr m by motorola for $49.99. >> shepard: the feds report traffic deaths on u.s. highways have dropped the lowest since harry truman was in the white house. a
a backdrop that would convince ambassadors from great britain and france for instance that the federal government was coherent and enormously powerful. so she made the white house into a showplace. and it became that. it was the emblem of the authority of the president. and she knew he had to have that -- >> and typically congress was constantly prosecuting them, or at least -- >> her. >> well, and not without cause. she did sell his annual address to congress to a newspaper to raise money. it wasn't a good thing to do. but -- >> but i loved the scene that you have with her and -- >> and thaddeus -- >> thaddeus stevens, the republican radical congressman from -- >> pennsylvania. >> pennsylvania played by tommy lee jones. here it is. >> mrs. lincoln. >> madame president, if you please. oh, don't convene another subcommittee to investigate me. sir! i'm teasing. smile senator wade. senator wade in lincoln: i believe i am smiling mrs. lincoln. >> as long as your household accounts are in order madam we'll have no need to investigate them. >> you have always taken such a lively even prosecu
through so that is some of the good news. frances dinglasan is in loser lisa this morning tracking the rain. >> pretty much gone now, so we are still picking up some returns south of san jose as live doppler 7-hd does a loop over the last few hours. roads are damp, cloudy and cool for the most part. we're not picking up much rain right now, just a few returns with areas of light green and blue. some of that is not reaching the ground. possibly light rain
. there are some people who think there should be a ban like in france. there are others that think you can do this in the regulatory margins. let's talk about that when we come back. in keeping the denture clean. dentures are very different to real teeth. they're about 10 times softer and may have surface pores where bacteria can multiply. polident is designed to clean dentures daily. its unique micro-clean formula kills 99.9% of odor causing bacteria and helps dissolve stains, cleaning in a better way than brushing with toothpaste. that's why i recommend using polident. [ male announcer ] polident. cleaner, fresher, brighter every day. but they haven't experienced extra strength bayer advanced aspirin. in fact, in a recent survey, 95% of people who tried it agreed that it relieved their headache fast. visit fastreliefchallenge.com today for a special trial offer. who have used androgel 1%, there's big news. presenting androgel 1.62%. both are used to treat men with low testosterone. androgel 1.62% is from the makers of the number one prescribed testosterone replacement therapy. it raises you
in europe is 25%. like france is not where we want to be on tax policy. the canadians are at 17%. where you have high marginal tax rates, it slows economic growth. you can see it on the corporate side and on the individual side. we will over time take the corporate rate to 25 from 35. because it will be better for growth, we will actually have more revenue for the government and not less. with government growth at 4% per year, reagan levels, versus 2% per year, france over last 20 years or obama over last four, you do that for decades, the federal cabinet raises $5 trillion in additional tax revenue. the best way to get revenue for the government at such strong, robust and jobs-creating economic growth. unfortunately, president obama and the democrats have taken the opposite direction over the last four years. that's why we are in this mess. host: now to an independent in georgia, al. if i would push the right button. sorry about that. al, good morning. caller: good morning. the last time you were on c- span, i managed to get through. it was on the heels of you going to atlanta and to chast
to reduce that to 25%. the reason is the average business tax in europe is 25%. like france is not where we want to be on tax policy. the canadians are at 17%. where you have high marginal tax rates, it slows economic growth. you can see it on the corporate side and on the individual side. we will over time take the corporate rate to 25 from 35. because it will be better for growth, we will actually have more revenue for the government and not less. with government growth at 4% per year, reagan levels, versus 2% per year, france over last 20 years or obama over last four, you do that for decades, the federal cabinet raises $5 trillion in additional tax revenue. the best way to get revenue for the government at such strong, robust and jobs-creating economic growth. unfortunately, president obama and the democrats have taken the opposite direction over the last four years. that's why we are in this mess. host: now to al, an independent in georgia. if i would push the right button. sorry about that. al, good morning. caller: good morning. the last time you were on c- span, i managed to get thr
france to tour deshame, lance armstrong's name is tarnished over doping allegations that haunted him for much of his cycling career. he is stripped of all seven titles. hulk hogan gets his hands outside the ring. his sex tape going viral this year. elmo puppeteer kevin clash resigning after 28 years, accused of having sex with underage boys. >> 9 clash 9 clash 9. >> and 9/9/9 all but forgotten. herr maine cane -- herman cain ending a presidential bid saying cheating rumors were ruining his marriage. arnold schwarzenegger with very public details on his cheating scandal. the 22-year-old kristin stewart admitting guessing too cozy with her director. john travolta has two male therapists file lawsuits against him claiming sexual assault. and the paparazzi getting, well, up close and personal with a topless sun-bathing kate middleton. >> what do you have to say about the verdict? >> 2012, one of the most infamous cases of sexual abuse. former penn state assistant coach jerry sandusky sentenced to at least 30 years behind bars for sexually abusing young boys. the late -- [inaudible] of th
to consider 15% or something like that. france passed a thing if you go over $1 million a year, your taxes are low on the first million. after that, they are taking 75% of the money. they ought to throw a little bit of fear into these people. it just shows the control the wealthy have over the government in both parties. host: more from "the washington post." they write -- back to the telephones. derrick from maryland on the line for democrats. your thoughts about the fiscal clause bill. caller: i think they will do a good deal if they can keep mitch mcconnell out of there. one of the things i really have a problem with, that is when thing i say democrats, let's get the ground game for 2014. republicansd of the at enter the house. let's take the house and just ran it all down their throats. host: we will move onto glen on the line for independents. caller: here is the problem that we have a. we have people that are working hard for the american people. we have a constitution. we have deviated from the constitution. host: who are the people working hard for the american people? caller: the
international leader. the u.s., britain, and france told bashar al assad to step down and allow a peaceful transition. he did not act accordingly. he continued to use his security forces and the army to target the civilians and the syrian demonstrators. at exactly the same time, when the international community tried to play a role in the security council, the security council was unable, because of russia and china, which vetoed three times, and double the toe -- double veto, any actions against the assange regime. -- assad regime. should the international community's do actions beyond our outside the security council? it is not allowed for more casualties to be killed. syria, as a nation and the country, is threatened. they side effect of that, as we see right now -- more radicalization, from the country. we see increasing anti-western sentiment in syrian society. that is maybe more to hottest from other countries enough to join the syrian -- more jihadists to join the syrian regime. that is different from maybe the assad regime. he called all the freedom fighters as a terrorist or jihad
and i had a chance to spend a little time on one of those trips and she went to france, egypt and tunisia. and i accompanied her on the plane and watched what was going on. she was non-stop. she took that kind of aggressive, non-stop travel to a certain degree from her husband the former president bill clinton. i traveled with him all of the time and he was non-stop, as well. we used to do day trips to bosnia or kosovo or whatever, and hillary clinton was like that. she moved, she moved, she moved, and i suspect we'll see that from john kerry and he knows he has four years to do what he needs to do and he'll try to milk as much of that as he possibly can. there are so many international issues out there on the agenda. i was surprised, i have to say. i thought he would speak after the president nominated him and say a few words and for some reason they decided he would not speak at the roosevelt room. normally they do that, but for whatever reason he didn't. he likes to talk, we know that. >> he does like to talk, and we know as well, secretary clinton when she was the first la
is even further down. >> oh, no. >> france is down as well. france is just a notch above. >> so why is the united states and germany both number 16? >> well, i think it's to do partly with the economic prospects which are not so great. also to do with things like crime rate in the united states, people like to feel safe and they feel safer in some of these european countries and australia does work very well, too. >> what's great britain's problem? why are they -- >> many problems in britain. not the least we have not such great economic prospects prepared for a lot of these countries. and we have high rates of social problems as well. >> a lot of it is to do with social cohesion. when you look at the countries in the top, switzerland, australia, denmark, singapore, they all have a strong sense of national and social cohesion and i would say one of the questions that really affects quality of life in a country today is do people feel they're pulling together and feel part of society or not? >> is there a consistency about the top countries, what they're doing in terms of economic pl
-enter france in the iranian internal affairs. it requires president obama to make that kind of concession, at least verbally, i think the president will go for that. maybe the president thought the key to getting a nuclear deal was to go out of his way publicly to assure the iranian regime, the islamic republic of iran, that we had in fact no business interfering and we are fine with the status quo. what are your thoughts on that? what you think the impact of that would be? >> i actually attended berkeley. [laughter] bat. >> one of the challenges in the international community is if there is some sort of nuclear deal -- the man at the nuclear deal is signed, a new phase of the arms control problem emerges which is called compliance. there is the question of whether the treaty will happen. how do you sustain pressure on other aspects of sirenian miss behavior in light of the nuclear deal? human rights is one and i will come back to that but today, the islamic republic stands convicted criminal lawyer accused, but convicted of terrorism on the american homeland with the conviction of the pl
person with a ph.d. in engineering from france. dick also started to all different committees. -- they also started 12 different committees. judiciary, committee on finance, and they were working on a number of products. i love today to talk about those projects those councils are working on. >> can we say a few words between the relationship of this council and the military? what we specifically referred to as the free syrian army? >> a few months ago they found it coalesce. it is headed up by the inspector general. all of those groups do maintain their separate identities. they are all fighting under the banner of this council. i would say the relationship is characterized it has two characteristics, if corroborative one and a competitive one. if it were not for that there would be no federated areas. everyone depends on the fsa to keep the assad regime from entering the city. that is the cooperative aspect. this is going into the future. you have an emergent civil society that is trying to govern this and provide basic goods and services. when i was an uphill i saw piles up
contributing countries. european union, france, others have already begun to really engage with the malian forces, so it isn't as if there is an abstinence of support for them in the intervening period. >> what lessons have we learned, if i might, ms. dory and mr. gast, i think the mission just celebrated the 50th anniversary. we were actively engaged in the training a good thing as a part of the very probably democracy support and in trying to create and sustain a cultural democracy what lessons are there that we might learn going forward about political failures and more on domestic issues in the work rather abrupt requirement that we break off relations and support here has created a great difficulty with regional consequences. what lessons would you suggest we learn? the best of times mali is a country in crisis. it is a country that ranks of the model of a dozen. the assistant secretary carson mentioned 90% of the population is in the south and that population is also in the need of services. the government hasn't included both in the delivery of services as well as the governments of
%. the reason is the average business tax in europe is 25%. stupider than france is not where we want to be. canadians are at 17%. when you have these high marginal tax rates, it slows economic growth. you can see it on the corporate side and the individual side. i think we will over time take the corporate rate to 25% from 35%. because it will be better for growth, we will have more revenue for the government, not less. if the government grows at 4% per year, reagan levels, versus 2% per year, france over the last years. do that for a decade, the federal government raises $5 trillion in additional tax revenue. the best way to get revenue for the government is a strong, robust, job-creating economic growth. unfortunately, president obama and the democrats are taking the opposite direction over the last four years and that is why we are in the mess we are in. host: al is an independent in georgia. please go ahead. i need to push the right button. sorry about that, al. hang on. you are on "washington journal". caller: good morning. the last time i managed to get through was on the heels of yo
then offered him the position as ambassador to france. >> researcher and author michael hill on elihu washburne, the only diplomat from a major power to stay during the siege of paris providing political and humanitarian support. >> "washington journal" continues. host: ari ne'eman is the president and co-founder of the autistics of advocacy network and is here to talk to us about the federal response to the rise in autism in the united states. our guest is an autistic adults and will be talking about the federal role in supporting an autistic adults and children. he testified before congress earlier this week, and that hearing was covered by c-span if you want to take a look at it. go to our website, c-span.org. thank you for being on the program. >> thank you for having me. >> first, talk to us about what is autism in terms of the spectrum of disorders and some of the symptoms people might want to be on the lookout for. >> i am really glad you asked that. often, people's perceptions of autism come from television or movies like "main man -- "rain man" or 60-second public service announcements
, keep the money here in the united states where we needed instead of trying to buy air france. >> host: how much money are responding militarily overseas? >> we have basic architecture of 750 bases scattered around the globe. is that oversees spending, not overseas spending? i still hear, spend it there. i'd like to count that. if you're talking about foreign aid, as it's sometimes called to my f-1 assistance program comes to about 5 percent of our gross domestic product faugh. if i said $26 billion it sounds like a lot of money, but the biggest department of defense appropriations $6,507,000,000,000 is a drop in the bucket. as a proportion of our total federal budget is six -- it is extremely small. so, you know, it is a common misperception in the american public that we spend a lot of money in foreign aid. in fact, if people it says we spend 15-25 percent of the budget on foreign aid. it is nowhere close to that. such than a single percentage point of our entire gdp, extremely small, so from my point of view on the whole that is a worthy investment, but it is not a very large one. >
for the time. the jefferson checks kim regime promoted democracy, localism and the sense of conflict in france, spain, great britain and mexico. they were found on the issue of slavery in the territory and southern nationalism. when you think about the jefferson-jackson party formation what they had was truly affect. bottled up along the eastern seaboard and they gained control over course of 50 years of the entire continent, the pacific. there is no possibility is that americans could settle that territory of the time. the the united states gained control of the arizona territory in 1846. it didn't become a state until 1914. the louisiana purchase the would begin to settle it in the 1850's when the slavery issue for the country apart. the republican regime orchestrated the industrialization of the nation based on the concept of economic liberty, the tariff and the gold standard. in 1865 the united states was an agricultural country about 30 million. when they were overthrown and was a highly industrialized country and probably the most prosperous country in the world. that wasn't six ackley
or napoleon's france, alexander the great mesopotamia. it is a progressive thing every society seems to go through. it goes from civilize to being uncivilized. host: beyond the disrespect you feel that you got as a kid to -- from the kids, what did you think about the security at the school? did you feel safe from perhaps an attack from the outside? caller: they had the doors locked. you had to ring a bell before you came in. if anybody wants to get into one of the schools and they come in with weapons, these military type equipment, there is no door that will stop them anyway. they can shoot the locks right off the door and they will be into the school within seconds. once somebody is going to do something like that that has their mind set on it, to stop it is next to impossible. there is no way of forcing it. i wish there was, but it is like terrorism. when somebody wants to create an act of terrorism, there is basically no way of stopping them. host: we will move on to joy in california. caller: good morning first. i would like to send out my condolences to all of the children and loved
friend of mind who lives here in the united states. he is of course living here, came from paris, france. his friends overseas are saying what is going on with the united states? these guys are actually saying, why can't the united states get this together because so many people throughout the world depend on us. look, our white house chief correspondent ed henry reports the president is rushing back to washington late tonight to get this deal done but is there enough christmas spirit and cheer on capitol hill that there can be goodwill expressed towards republicans and democrats to work in harm any to harmony to find something amenable to everybody? >> i think public opinion out there, public opinion clearly is not favorable to republicans at this moment about the fiscal cliff and the markets out there again could be very, very harsh if there is no deal. so i don't know about christmas cheer but i think there are certain political realities that say there's got to be something done, even if it's a temporary patch that allows them to say we're going to have the big vote in terms of the c
and others died when the playplane crashed in the mountains between france and italy. it took decade toz recovery the wreckage. he was identified through dna testing. one oregon mom gets a special early christmas gift from her son. >> merry christmas. >> i can't believe it. >> gretchen: that is sailor jeremy fogul. his mom didn't think he would make it home. sue said the surprise means that because jeremy spent last christmas in afghanistan as well >> clayton: merry christmas to all of the brave men and women around the world. this debate is not going to go down soon. the debate over gun control in this country . this comes on the heels of what happened on friday whenways conference that was critized and he was set to go on meet the press this weekend and everybody was going to see if he would offer up a consession. he's not budging at all. >> if it is crazy to call for putting police and armed security in our scol call me crazy. i tell you what, i think the american people think it is crazy not to do it. it is the one thing that keeps people safe and the n ra will do that. we'll support
and france are about to go in recession. when you have a shaky economy, piling on taxes does not work. spain's has been raising taxes. we have not seen anything like this with governments deliberately raising taxes on a scale since the early 1930's. they should be going in the opposite direction. they are putting more burdens on the private economies. host: somebody who may be in your income group wrote an op-ed about a month ago and this is part of it. i want to get your reaction. guest: in terms of income and what people effectively pay in tax rates, people and higher incomes pay effective tax rates three times those earning middle incomes in this country. salaried income versus capital gains gets confused. capital gains are no sure things. it is a high-risk proposition. there has always been a lower rate for capital gains. you would see this economy crater and hope of investment and go by the boards. bill clinton lowered the tax rates. to reverse that trend, that was a bad decade, the 1970 's. we have seen that in other countries. raise the rates and you get less investment and a lower st
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